Embarrassing FAQs




1. Am I supposed to tip? If you get a massage at a spa or hotel, a 15% to 20% tip is standard if you were pleased with the services. On the other hand, there are no real ground rules or norms when it comes to massage in a medical setting. Some massage therapists and massage associations I asked said tipping isn't appropriate in a medical or clinical setting. If you're not sure, don't be afraid to ask if tipping is customary. You can call ahead to ask if you don't want to do it face to face. If tipping isn't the norm, you can always show your appreciation by referring friends, family and co-workers to the massage therapist

2. Am I supposed to take of my underwear? Many people prefer to keep their panties or briefs on during a massage, while others prefer to be completely nude. It's up to you. If your problem areas are your lower back, hips, buttocks, or groin, tight-fitting underwear can sometimes get in the way of massage work, but a thong for women or briefs for men should do the trick. In North America, if you do remove your underwear, licensed massage therapists must ensure that you are always properly covered by a sheet or towel. Only the area being massaged will be uncovered.

3. Will the massage therapist be there when I undress? In North America, the massage therapist will leave the room so that you can remove your clothing and lie on the massage table (usually face down) under the top sheet. Don't rush or worry that the massage therapist will walk in on you -- the massage therapist always knocks and asks if you are ready before entering the massage room.

4. Should I talk during the massage? Although some people prefer to talk throughout the massage, don't feel like you have to make conversation with the massage therapist. After all, you're having a treatment, you're not at a cocktail party! Feel free to close your eyes and relax, which is what most people do. Deep tissue massage and sports massage are just some of the types of massages that require more feedback. e massage therapist open works on deeper layers of muscle and will want to ensure that the pressure is not uncomfortable. Be sure to speak up if:
- the room is too hot or too cold
- you experience pain
- you have any questions related to the massage
- there's anything you forgot to mention during the consultation

5. The pressure isn't deep enough, but I don't want to insult the therapist's technique. What should I do?
Communicate openly with the massage therapist. Keep in mind however that it's a myth that massage therapy has to hurt to be effective.